Comparative Analysis of Different Brands of Ibuprofen available on the Georgian Pharmaceutical Market

Authors

  • Zurab R. Tsetskhladze Scientific-Research Institute of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Teaching University Geomedi, Tbilisi, 0114, Georgia Author https://orcid.org/0000-0003-0774-0020
  • Marina Pirtskhalava Teaching University Geomedi, Tbilisi, 0114, Georgia Author https://orcid.org/0000-0002-0464-1345
  • Malkhaz Vakhania Scientific-Research Institute of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Teaching University Geomedi, Tbilisi, 0114, Georgia Author
  • Mariam Kobiashvili Scientific-Research Institute of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Teaching University Geomedi, Tbilisi, 0114, Georgia Author
  • Tornike Mindiashvili Scientific-Research Institute of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Teaching University Geomedi, Tbilisi, 0114, Georgia Author

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.56580/GEOMEDI34

Keywords:

Ibuprofen, Georgia, Spectrophotometry, Generic drug, Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient

Abstract

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 1 out of 10 medical products in developing countries are substandard or falsified. Since Georgia is a developing country and is listed among the countries where substandard and falsified medical products have been discovered and reported to WHO, it is important to explore the quality of medical products available on the Georgian pharmaceutical market. As an initial study, we have chosen one of the most widely used drugs worldwide – ibuprofen, available in the pharmacy network in Tbilisi – the capital of Georgia. We have studied 10 different brands, imported and locally produced, and 2 brand-name ibuprofens (Motrin and Advil). The content of the Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) was determined by a spectrophotometer, in the ultraviolet region. The obtained results showed that all brand ibuprofens contained labeled amounts of API.

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Published

2023-12-29

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Articles

How to Cite

1.
Tsetskhladze ZR, Pirtskhalava M, Vakhania M, Kobiashvili M, Mindiashvili T. Comparative Analysis of Different Brands of Ibuprofen available on the Georgian Pharmaceutical Market. MIMM. 2023;26(2):40-48. doi:10.56580/GEOMEDI34